Hello everyone,

Term 3 is right around the corner, an important time for everyone of you. For the L6 it will be your end of year exam soon! and for the U6 it will be your life-altering A-Levels. Dumdidumdummmmm

Remember if you have travelled within the last week (arriving in Brunei after the 23rd of June) you are advised to stay at home for another week from the day that you arrived here. (You lucky people!)

Here’s something to cheer us up. Which one can you identify most with yourself?? You can leave your comments below

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Looking forward to seeing you all =)

Since the L6 are doing crime and punishment (and this will be a good read for the U6) as well, I came across an article that would be highly relevant to us and would be good to talk about in class.

Last moments of Ben Kinsella revealed as three are convicted of stabbing him to death for ‘disrespect’

Killers seen chasing Ben on CCTV moments before stabbing

Ben steps out from behind a van after being stabbed by three youths in the early hours of the morning in North London. At first glance he looks unharmed

Ben steps out from behind a van after being stabbed by three youths in the early hours of the morning in North London. At first glance he looks unharmed

As he steps out into the middle of the road it can be seen that Ben's shirt is covered in blood on his left side

As he steps out into the middle of the road it can be seen that Ben's shirt is covered in blood on his left side

As he continues across the road to rejoin his friends he begins to weave and stumble. As he reaches the corner of the street, he collapses out of sight

As he continues across the road to rejoin his friends he begins to weave and stumble. As he reaches the corner of the street, he collapses out of sight


Apparently the murderers showed no remorse in stabbing Ben. Why do you think people like these exist in a developed society? What are the reasons for commiting crime? Is it something innate? Or something learned from society? What do you think??

As you all know by now, I am a fan of the weird and bizarre

Here’s one! Jyoti is the smallest girl in the world

Jyoti at school

Jyoti at school

She is determined to lead a normal life which is very admirable – but do you think she will be faced with discrimination? A UK TV channel is going to make a series about her life. Do you think reality tv shows are good? Or are they exploiting those who are disadvantaged? Tell me what you think!

For the whole detailed report. Click here

A recent academic study confirmed that men – particularly fathers – are under-represented in almost all children’s books. And when they do appear, like the fathers in Gorilla and Zoo, they are often withdrawn, or obsessed with themselves, or just utterly ineffectual.

Why had this never bothered me? Because it’s all around us, everywhere we look. For years, men in our stories – not just for children, but adults, too – have been losing their authority. Not just years – decades. It’s crept up on us and now it’s everywhere.
Remember when movie stars were strong and decisive? That was a long time ago now: , Gary Cooper, Errol Flynn.

And wherever you look, things seem to be getting worse for guys. In a survey of 1,000 TV adverts, made by writer Frederic Hayward, he points out that: ‘100 per cent of the jerks singled out in male-female relationships were male.’

So does this mean that there is something wrong with the way we portray men? Or – much more seriously – is there some deep trouble with men themselves? I can’t bear to have that thought. Can you?

From here

Hello all! Just a quick one. Here’s a good link to a website that deals with a lot of issues that we have talked about and probably will be talking about in the near future!

http://www.globalissues.org/issue

In light of the project the L6 are in the process of doing, here’s an interesting video (i think!) on greening schools

Remember how we talked about Disney and Racism?

Here’s something new that they have done to promote diversity

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In the 72 years since Walt Disney’s animated version of Snow White captivated audiences as “the fairest of them all,” there have only been eight such Disney princesses. Through these movies and a line of toys, dresses and figurines, the Disney princesses have become global, doe-eyed icons of childhood. Sleeping Beauty awakened by a kiss, Cinderella’s clock striking midnight, Belle waltzing in the Beast’s castle, Ariel with Prince Eric in the moonlit lagoon — these have become heroines whom parents the world over feel safe to let their young girls idolize and mimic. And while Disney has brought us nonwhite princesses before (see “Mulan,” “Pocahontas”), Tiana is a first.

The implied message of Tiana, that black American girls can be as elegant as Snow White herself, is a milestone in the national imagery, according to a range of scholars and cultural historians.

For the whole article, click here

article-1162718-03f37c2e000005dc-317_468x377However, there are still some people who are not too happy about it. Want to know why? You can read more here